inothernews:

INLAND / ISLAND   Pakistani  villagers take shelter on a dry patch in the flood-hit Badin district  of Sindh province on September 14. Pakistan called on the world to speed  up relief efforts after torrential rains exacerbated major floods,  killing 270 people and making another 200,000 homeless in the south of  the country.  (Photo: Asif Hassan / AFP-Getty via MSNBC.com)

inothernews:

INLAND / ISLAND   Pakistani villagers take shelter on a dry patch in the flood-hit Badin district of Sindh province on September 14. Pakistan called on the world to speed up relief efforts after torrential rains exacerbated major floods, killing 270 people and making another 200,000 homeless in the south of the country.  (Photo: Asif Hassan / AFP-Getty via MSNBC.com)

nationalpost:

Photos of the daySmoke and flame rise from burning oil tankers on the highway near Kolpur village, Pakistan on August 22, 2011. Gunmen set ablaze at least 19 oil tankers carrying fuel for NATO forces in neighbouring Afghanistan, officials said.

nationalpost:

Photos of the day
Smoke and flame rise from burning oil tankers on the highway near Kolpur village, Pakistan on August 22, 2011. Gunmen set ablaze at least 19 oil tankers carrying fuel for NATO forces in neighbouring Afghanistan, officials said.

The cellphone of Osama bin Laden’s trusted courier, which was recovered in the raid that killed both men in Pakistan last month, contained contacts to a militant group that is a longtime asset of Pakistan’s intelligence agency, senior American officials who have been briefed on the findings say.

The discovery indicates that Bin Laden used the group, Harakat-ul-Mujahedeen, as part of his support network inside the country, the officials and others said. But it also raised tantalizing questions about whether the group and others like it helped shelter and support Bin Laden on behalf of Pakistan’s spy agency, given that it had mentored Harakat and allowed it to operate in Pakistan for at least 20 years, the officials and analysts said.

In tracing the calls on the cellphone, American analysts have determined that Harakat commanders had called Pakistani intelligence officials, the senior American officials said. One said they had met. The officials added that the contacts were not necessarily about Bin Laden and his protection and that there was no “smoking gun” showing that Pakistan’s spy agency had protected Bin Laden.

But the cellphone numbers provide one of the most intriguing leads yet in the hunt for the answer to an urgent and vexing question for Washington: How was it that Bin Laden was able to live comfortably for years in Abbottabad, a town dominated by the Pakistani military and only a three-hour drive from Islamabad, the capital?

“It’s a serious lead,” said one American official, who has been briefed in broad terms on the cellphone analysis. “It’s an avenue we’re investigating.”

The revelation also provides a potentially critical piece of the puzzle about Bin Laden’s secret odyssey after he slipped away from American forces in the Tora Bora region of Afghanistan nearly 10 years ago. It may help answer how and why Bin Laden or his protectors chose Abbottabad, where he was killed in a raid by a Navy Seals team on May 2.

The New York Times, “Seized Cellphone Offers Clues to bin Laden’s Pakistani Links.”

Ugh.

Also: for those of you wondering why we need newspapers?

Stories like this are why we need newspapers.

(via inothernews)

Pakistan, humiliated because the U.S. sneaked into their country and killed Osama bin Laden -- who may or may not have had help from the country's intelligence agency in hiding away in his three-story mansion near Pakistan's West Point for FIVE YEARS -- did the only thing that came natural: they outed the CIA's station chief in Islamabad. ↘

douchey

inothernews:

I can’t wait until we’re out of Afghanistan.

Relations with Pakistan could get rough — they had to know bin Laden was there (in Abbottabad) His million-dollar compound was less than 40 miles from Pakistan’s capital. That’s like escaping Washington, D.C. by hiding out in Baltimore. …And it turns out bin Laden was hiding out just 1,000 yards from the prestigious Kakul Military Academy, the ‘West Point of Pakistan.’ Now, in (the Pakistanis’) defense, the compound had very high walls, so they may have seen their neighbor only from the eyes up — like Wilson, from Home Improvement.

STEPHEN COLBERT, The Colbert Report (via inothernews)

inothernews:

A Muslim man celebrated Eid-e-Milad-un-Nabi, the birthday of Prophet  Muhammad, in Peshawar, Pakistan, Tuesday. (Photo: A. Majeed / AFP-Getty via the Wall St. Journal)

inothernews:

A Muslim man celebrated Eid-e-Milad-un-Nabi, the birthday of Prophet Muhammad, in Peshawar, Pakistan, Tuesday. (Photo: A. Majeed / AFP-Getty via the Wall St. Journal)